SINOBUG
Dead Leaf Mimic Lappet Moth (Radhica elisabethae, Lasiocampidae)
Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?


I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base.
I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike. 

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there. 

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.) 

The hard decision is usually deciding when to pack up and go home, just in case that “amazing one” arrives…..

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Dead Leaf Mimic Lappet Moth (Radhica elisabethae, Lasiocampidae)

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base. I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike.

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there.

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.)

The hard decision is usually deciding when to pack up and go home, just in case that “amazing one” arrives…..

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomisidae)
 See other images of spiders of the family Thomisidae in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae. 

Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects. 

Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards. 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomisidae)

See other images of spiders of the family Thomisidae in my Flickr photostream HERE.

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae.

Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects.

Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..

If a tree falls in the forest……

Moth Caterpillars (Lasiocampidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Yellow Marmorated Stink Bug (Erthesina fullo, Pentatomidae)adult (above) and nymph (below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Yellow Marmorated Stink Bug (Erthesina fullo, Pentatomidae)
adult (above) and nymph (below)


Late instar Yellow Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph (Erthesina fullo, Pentatomidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tailed Judy (Abisara neophron, Riodinidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tailed Judy (Abisara neophron, Riodinidae)

Tailed Judy (Abisara neophron, Riodinidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

A Tiger Brown (Orinoma damaris, Satyrinae, Nymphalidae) competes with ants for the sap bubbling from an injured tree


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..
Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bug (Tessaratomidae) 

See images of the nymphal forms of Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs in my photostream HERE. And more adult Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs HERE.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bug (Tessaratomidae)

See images of the nymphal forms of Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs in my photostream HERE. And more adult Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bugs HERE.

Tessaratomid Giant Shield Bug (Tessaratomidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Shield Bugs (Dalpada sp., Pentatomidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Shield Bugs (Dalpada sp., Pentatomidae)

An Amazing Leaf (with a bug on it)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Aristobia voeti, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)
(attracted to MV night light and keen to leave)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Aristobia voeti, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)
(attracted to MV night light and keen to leave)

Longhorn Beetle (Aristobia voeti, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

Limacodid Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

SINOBUG Daily Photoblog


Every day for the past THREE years (1096 days and counting), I have posted an image on my Sinobug daily photoblog on Aminus3.


Click HERE to see today’s entry

or

HERE to browse the multitude of past postings.


The Usual Suspects

by Sinobug (itchydogimages)
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……
Mid-instar Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)
Late Instar Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia)(below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Mid-instar Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)

Late Instar Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)

Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Zygaenid Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia, Chalcosiinae, Zygaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lady Beetle (Harmonia sp., Coccinellidae)

Although cannibalism of eggs by Coccinellid larva (in fact amongst and between all hungry Coccinellid life stages) is well-recognized and researched (this occurs typically when prey sources are limited in quality and quantity, or as an intentional means of boosting survival probability for first hatchings where egg clustering occurs), less is known about egg cannibalism and predation by adult Coccinellidae. What is apparent (maybe because they are an easier genus to study and very common), is that the Harmonia genus seems to be very adept at cannibalism at all stages of life both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Cannibalism of other Coccinellid species is significant where Harmonia occur as an invasive species (i.e. everywhere outside of Asia) and where they are overwhelming native species.

Certainly, nutritional stress and interspecies competition are logical reasons for egg cannibalism by adult beetles, but it is also proposed that females lay fertile and trophic (infertile) eggs. The purpose of the unviable trophic eggs is purely for the nutritional benefit of the female and not a failure of the reproductive process, and not a phenomenon restricted to lady beetles. So, in fact, the consumption of Coccinellid eggs by adult beetles is not an act of cannibalism in these circumstances, but an intentional  behavior aimed at supplementing nutrition.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lady Beetle (Harmonia sp., Coccinellidae)

Although cannibalism of eggs by Coccinellid larva (in fact amongst and between all hungry Coccinellid life stages) is well-recognized and researched (this occurs typically when prey sources are limited in quality and quantity, or as an intentional means of boosting survival probability for first hatchings where egg clustering occurs), less is known about egg cannibalism and predation by adult Coccinellidae. What is apparent (maybe because they are an easier genus to study and very common), is that the Harmonia genus seems to be very adept at cannibalism at all stages of life both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Cannibalism of other Coccinellid species is significant where Harmonia occur as an invasive species (i.e. everywhere outside of Asia) and where they are overwhelming native species.

Certainly, nutritional stress and interspecies competition are logical reasons for egg cannibalism by adult beetles, but it is also proposed that females lay fertile and trophic (infertile) eggs. The purpose of the unviable trophic eggs is purely for the nutritional benefit of the female and not a failure of the reproductive process, and not a phenomenon restricted to lady beetles. So, in fact, the consumption of Coccinellid eggs by adult beetles is not an act of cannibalism in these circumstances, but an intentional behavior aimed at supplementing nutrition.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..