SINOBUG
Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)

Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fishfly (Corydalidae, Megaloptera)

The family Corydalidae contains the megalopterous insects known as dobsonflies and fishflies.
 
Fishflies are sizeable Megalopterans, with a body usually larger than 25 mm. They often have long filamentous antennae, though in male fishflies they are characteristically feathered. The four large wings are translucent, smoky grey, or mixed, and the anterior pair is slightly longer than the posterior one.
 
The larvae are aquatic, active, armed with strong sharp mandibles, and breathe by means of abdominal branchial filaments. When full sized - which can take several years - they leave the water and spend a quiescent pupal stage on the land, in chambers dug under stones or logs, before metamorphosis into the sexually mature insect.
 
(attracted to MV lamp)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Fishfly (Corydalidae, Megaloptera)

The family Corydalidae contains the megalopterous insects known as dobsonflies and fishflies.

Fishflies are sizeable Megalopterans, with a body usually larger than 25 mm. They often have long filamentous antennae, though in male fishflies they are characteristically feathered. The four large wings are translucent, smoky grey, or mixed, and the anterior pair is slightly longer than the posterior one.

The larvae are aquatic, active, armed with strong sharp mandibles, and breathe by means of abdominal branchial filaments. When full sized - which can take several years - they leave the water and spend a quiescent pupal stage on the land, in chambers dug under stones or logs, before metamorphosis into the sexually mature insect.

(attracted to MV lamp)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Pyralid Snout Moth (Orybina flaviplaga, Pyralidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Pyralid Snout Moth (Orybina flaviplaga, Pyralidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae, Geometridae)
(female top of image, male bottom of image and below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae, Geometridae)
(female top of image, male bottom of image and below)

Geometrid Moth (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae), male

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Zygaenid Moth (Eterusia aedea, Zygaenidae)

Red Slug Caterpillar of Eterusia aedea (Zygaenidae) (below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Zygaenid Moth (Eterusia aedea, Zygaenidae)

Zygaenid Moth (Eterusia aedea, Zygaenidae)

Red Slug Caterpillar of Eterusia aedea (Zygaenidae) (below)

Red Slug Caterpillar of Eterusia aedea (Zygaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hawk Moth (Parum colligata, Sphingidae)
Parum is a genus of moths in the Sphingidae family, containing only one species, Parum colligata, which is found from Korea and Japan south throughout eastern and central China and Taiwan to Vietnam, northern Thailand and north-eastern Myanmar.
The wingspan is 69-90 mm. There are one or two generations per year in northern China, with adults on wing from May to July. Farther south, there may be up to four generations.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hawk Moth (Parum colligata, Sphingidae)

Parum is a genus of moths in the Sphingidae family, containing only one species, Parum colligata, which is found from Korea and Japan south throughout eastern and central China and Taiwan to Vietnam, northern Thailand and north-eastern Myanmar. The wingspan is 69-90 mm. There are one or two generations per year in northern China, with adults on wing from May to July. Farther south, there may be up to four generations.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moth (Corymica spatiosa, Ennominae, Geometridae), female

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moth (Corymica spatiosa, Ennominae, Geometridae), female

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Eupterotid Moths (Tagora sp., Eupterotidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Eupterotid Moths (Tagora sp., Eupterotidae)

Eupterotid Moths (Tagora sp., Eupterotidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hawk Moth (Cechenena subangustata, Sphingidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hawk Moth (Cechenena subangustata, Sphingidae)

Hawk Moth (Cechenena subangustata, Sphingidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lymantriid Moth (Actornis sp., Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lymantriid Moth (Actornis sp., Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Trial Flight

When caterpillars involuntarily or intentionally drop from the tree canopy, they can regain their original position by climbing silk lifelines spun out from the head spinnerets. They may utilise this feature when disturbed and as a means of escape from predators or when it comes time to relocate due to defoliation or to moult or pupate.
Image BELOW: Tiny early instar Nolid Moth caterpillars (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) shimmy up a silken lifeline back to the leaf they bungeed from when disturbed. Each caterpillar made the leap of faith on their own strand of silk but the multiple strands coalesce when they come into contact with each other providing a more stable return journey.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Trial Flight

When caterpillars involuntarily or intentionally drop from the tree canopy, they can regain their original position by climbing silk lifelines spun out from the head spinnerets. They may utilise this feature when disturbed and as a means of escape from predators or when it comes time to relocate due to defoliation or to moult or pupate.

Image BELOW: Tiny early instar Nolid Moth caterpillars (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) shimmy up a silken lifeline back to the leaf they bungeed from when disturbed. Each caterpillar made the leap of faith on their own strand of silk but the multiple strands coalesce when they come into contact with each other providing a more stable return journey.

Ahhhh, the good old Indian rope trick......

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Miresa fulgida, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Miresa fulgida, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..