SINOBUG
Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cousins

Two different species of the same genus of Nolid Moths (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) stand shoulder-to-shoulder at the MV (mercury vapour) night light.
Titulcia meterythra on the left and Titulcia confictella on the right.

If I had naming rights to this genus of moths, it would be Mirror Moths. The white scaled areas of the wings are highly reflective…..
Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?


I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base.
I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike. 

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there. 

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.) 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cousins

Two different species of the same genus of Nolid Moths (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) stand shoulder-to-shoulder at the MV (mercury vapour) night light.

Titulcia meterythra on the left and Titulcia confictella on the right.

If I had naming rights to this genus of moths, it would be Mirror Moths. The white scaled areas of the wings are highly reflective…..

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base.
I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike.

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there.

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Gossiping Pale Hedge Blues (Udara dilecta, Lycaenidae)

Mud-puddling, or simply puddling, is behaviour most conspicuous in butterflies, but occurs in other animals as well, mainly insects; they seek out certain moist substances such as rotting plant matter, mud and carrion and they suck up the fluid. Where the conditions are suitable, butterflies will form sizable aggregations. 


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Gossiping Pale Hedge Blues (Udara dilecta, Lycaenidae)

Mud-puddling, or simply puddling, is behaviour most conspicuous in butterflies, but occurs in other animals as well, mainly insects; they seek out certain moist substances such as rotting plant matter, mud and carrion and they suck up the fluid. Where the conditions are suitable, butterflies will form sizable aggregations.

Pale Hedge Blues (Udara dilecta, Lycaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nail Polish by Dior Vernis in Massai Red
Tussock Moth (Lymantria marginalis, Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nail Polish by Dior Vernis in Massai Red

Tussock Moth (Lymantria marginalis, Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Sesiidae - The Next Generation

A Clearwing Moth (Synanthedon sp., Sesiidae) deposits an egg on a leaf…..

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Sesiidae - The Next Generation

A Clearwing Moth (Synanthedon sp., Sesiidae) deposits an egg on a leaf…..

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hostile Haute Couture

This unfortunate tiny weevil has been attacked by an entomopathogenic fungus. 

An entomopathogenic fungus is a fungus that can act as a parasite of insects and kills or seriously disables them.

These fungi usually attach to the external body surface of insects in the form of microscopic spores (usually asexual, mitosporic spores also called conidia). These spores germinate, grow as hyphae and colonize the insect’s cuticle; eventually they bore through it and reach the insects’ body cavity. Then, the fungal cells proliferate in the host body cavity, usually as walled hyphae or in the form of wall-less protoplasts (depending on the fungus involved). After some time the insect is usually killed (sometimes by fungal toxins) and new propagules (spores) are formed in/on the insect if environmental conditions are permissive.

Although still alive when this shot was taken, this weevil’s fate is sealed. It has been infected by the fungus which will eventually penetrate its exoskeleton and cause its demise.

It seems weevils in particular are susceptible to instances of body-snatching like this as I have seen this phenomenon in other species before.



by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Hostile Haute Couture

This unfortunate tiny weevil has been attacked by an entomopathogenic fungus.

An entomopathogenic fungus is a fungus that can act as a parasite of insects and kills or seriously disables them.

These fungi usually attach to the external body surface of insects in the form of microscopic spores (usually asexual, mitosporic spores also called conidia). These spores germinate, grow as hyphae and colonize the insect’s cuticle; eventually they bore through it and reach the insects’ body cavity. Then, the fungal cells proliferate in the host body cavity, usually as walled hyphae or in the form of wall-less protoplasts (depending on the fungus involved). After some time the insect is usually killed (sometimes by fungal toxins) and new propagules (spores) are formed in/on the insect if environmental conditions are permissive.

Although still alive when this shot was taken, this weevil’s fate is sealed. It has been infected by the fungus which will eventually penetrate its exoskeleton and cause its demise.

It seems weevils in particular are susceptible to instances of body-snatching like this as I have seen this phenomenon in other species before.

Weevil Plus One....

Weevil with fungal infection

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Asian Skimmer Pair (Orthetrum glaucum)
Male Asian Skimmer (Orthetrum glaucum)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Asian Skimmer Pair (Orthetrum glaucum)

Asian Skimmer (Orthetrum glaucum)
Male Asian Skimmer (Orthetrum glaucum)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Noctuid Moth (Homodes vivida, Catocalinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Noctuid Moth (Homodes vivida, Catocalinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae)

Cup Moth larvae are often highly ornamented and brightly colored. Two main types can be distinguished: larvae armed with rows of protuberances bearing stinging spines called nettle caterpillars, or non-spined forms where the surface of the larvae may by completely smooth, called gelatine caterpillars. The larvae of this family bear no prolegs on their abdominal segments. The larva attaches itself to the substrate by means of an adhesive ventral surface. The movement is like a slug hence their generic name. 
A stinging slug caterpillar (like this one) generally bears warning colouration and stinging hairs. These hairs can inject a venom from poison sacs carried at their base that are used as defensive weapons. Reactions can range from a mild itching to a very painful sting.  


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in my Flickr photostream, HERE.

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae)

Cup Moth larvae are often highly ornamented and brightly colored. Two main types can be distinguished: larvae armed with rows of protuberances bearing stinging spines called nettle caterpillars, or non-spined forms where the surface of the larvae may by completely smooth, called gelatine caterpillars. The larvae of this family bear no prolegs on their abdominal segments. The larva attaches itself to the substrate by means of an adhesive ventral surface. The movement is like a slug hence their generic name.
A stinging slug caterpillar (like this one) generally bears warning colouration and stinging hairs. These hairs can inject a venom from poison sacs carried at their base that are used as defensive weapons. Reactions can range from a mild itching to a very painful sting.

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae) "Yellow Devil"

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in my Flickr photostream, HERE.

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fulvous Forest Skimmer (Neurothemis fulvia)

The sunbasking nature of these dragonflies makes them very visible - they practically glow amidst greenery. Put them amongst autumn and winter leaf litter however, and they practically disappear.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fulvous Forest Skimmer (Neurothemis fulvia)

The sunbasking nature of these dragonflies makes them very visible - they practically glow amidst greenery. Put them amongst autumn and winter leaf litter however, and they practically disappear.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Limacodidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in my Flickr photostream, HERE.

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Limacodidae)

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Limacodidae) "Chameleon"

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

View my other images of Limacodid Caterpillars from China (Beijing and Yunnan) in my Flickr photostream, HERE.

Praying Mantis (Statilia nemoralis), female

The identifying feature of this mantis species is the black and white “eye” on the inside of the forelimb.



by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Praying Mantis (Statilia nemoralis), female

The identifying feature of this mantis species is the black and white “eye” on the inside of the forelimb.

Praying Mantis (Statilia nemoralis)

Praying Mantis (Statilia nemoralis)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Robber Fly (Asilidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese flies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Robber Fly (Asilidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese flies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth Caterpillar (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

The swollen thorax of these caterpillars is believed to be mimicking unpalatable berries as a deterrent against hungry birds. 
Locally these are mass infestation larvae responsible for entire tree defoliation.

Although very common at this time of year, they pose a photographic challenge in that, undisturbed (and if not eating), they adopt regal poses (head and tails raised) individually and as groups. The slightest disturbance (and because they usually reside on the underside of leaves) such as moving foliage to catch the best angle, they either flatten out and vomit green fluid which tends to spoil the shot, or they throw themselves into space on a silk thread lifeline to resume their positions when danger has passed.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth Caterpillar (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

The swollen thorax of these caterpillars is believed to be mimicking unpalatable berries as a deterrent against hungry birds. Locally these are mass infestation larvae responsible for entire tree defoliation.

Although very common at this time of year, they pose a photographic challenge in that, undisturbed (and if not eating), they adopt regal poses (head and tails raised) individually and as groups. The slightest disturbance (and because they usually reside on the underside of leaves) such as moving foliage to catch the best angle, they either flatten out and vomit green fluid which tends to spoil the shot, or they throw themselves into space on a silk thread lifeline to resume their positions when danger has passed.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..