SINOBUG
Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth (Trabala vishnou, Lasiocampidae), female

Mid-instar Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala vishnou)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth (Trabala vishnou, Lasiocampidae), female

Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth (Trabala vishnou, Lasiocampidae), female

Mid-instar Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala vishnou)

Mid-instar Rose Myrtle Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala vishnou, Lasiocampidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

Despite being a very common moth for a large part of the year, this species remains unidentified. Every second leaf has at least one on its underside (they regularly occur in groups). However, I have never encountered one at the night light, always during the day.
 
There are two distinct types with subtle variations in the white markings on the wings (see image below). I am unsure if these are separate species or gender dimorphism but they do occur as mixed populations i.e. one or more of each type will keep company with the other.


The sheer numbers of them and the fact that they are clearly of the Chloephorinae subfamily would lead me to believe (Holmes and Watson-style) that this is the moth of the berry-mimicking nolid caterpillars which are equally common throughout the year except during the drier winter months.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

Despite being a very common moth for a large part of the year, this species remains unidentified. Every second leaf has at least one on its underside (they regularly occur in groups). However, I have never encountered one at the night light, always during the day.

There are two distinct types with subtle variations in the white markings on the wings (see image below). I am unsure if these are separate species or gender dimorphism but they do occur as mixed populations i.e. one or more of each type will keep company with the other.

Nolid Moth (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

The sheer numbers of them and the fact that they are clearly of the Chloephorinae subfamily would lead me to believe (Holmes and Watson-style) that this is the moth of the berry-mimicking nolid caterpillars which are equally common throughout the year except during the drier winter months.

Nolid Moth Caterpillar (Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Crimson Assassin Bug Nymph (Reduviidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Crimson Assassin Bug Nymph (Reduviidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Jeweled Flower Mantis (Creobroter gemmatus, Hymenopodidae) on Lantana Umbels
See more images of Creobroter gemmatus, both adults and nymphal stages, in my Flickr photostream HERE.

See more images of vibrant Lantana blooms in my Flickr photostream HERE.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Jeweled Flower Mantis (Creobroter gemmatus, Hymenopodidae) on Lantana Umbels

See more images of Creobroter gemmatus, both adults and nymphal stages, in my Flickr photostream HERE.

See more images of vibrant Lantana blooms in my Flickr photostream HERE.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Epiplemiine Moth (Oroplema plagifera, Epipleminae, Uraniidae)

The top image is a rather unusual view of this moth. Many of the smaller epiplemiine moths are wing-rollers, probably as a means of crypsis, and this is usually exhibited in the resting position. In this case, this moth was on the move and preparing for flight, so the wings are fully extended.
 
The image below is the more typically seen appearance of this moth species….


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Epiplemiine Moth (Oroplema plagifera, Epipleminae, Uraniidae)

The top image is a rather unusual view of this moth. Many of the smaller epiplemiine moths are wing-rollers, probably as a means of crypsis, and this is usually exhibited in the resting position. In this case, this moth was on the move and preparing for flight, so the wings are fully extended.

The image below is the more typically seen appearance of this moth species….

Epiplemiine Moth (Oroplema plagifera, Epipleminae, Uraniidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Crambid Moth (Notesia tranquillalis, Spilomelinae, Crambidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Crambid Moth (Notesia tranquillalis, Spilomelinae, Crambidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth (Gabala argentata, Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Nolid Moth (Gabala argentata, Chloephorinae, Nolidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Footman Moth (Barsine striata, Lithosiini, Arctiinae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Footman Moth (Barsine striata, Lithosiini, Arctiinae)

Footman Moth (Barsine striata, Lithosiini, Arctiinae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Notodontid Moth (Syntypistis sp., Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Notodontid Moth (Syntypistis sp., Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Tarsolepis taiwana, Notodontidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Tarsolepis taiwana, Notodontidae)

Prominent Moth (Tarsolepis taiwana, Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala sp., Lasiocampidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala sp., Lasiocampidae)

Lappet Moth Caterpillar (Trabala sp., Lasiocampidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

….and its stinging nettle slug caterpillar….

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

Cup Moth (Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

….and its stinging nettle slug caterpillar….

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Mahanta sp., Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cup Moth (Demonarosa rufotessellata, Limacodidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cousins

Two different species of the same genus of Nolid Moths (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) stand shoulder-to-shoulder at the MV (mercury vapour) night light.
Titulcia meterythra on the left and Titulcia confictella on the right.

If I had naming rights to this genus of moths, it would be Mirror Moths. The white scaled areas of the wings are highly reflective…..
Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?


I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base.
I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike. 

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there. 

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.) 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Cousins

Two different species of the same genus of Nolid Moths (Chloephorinae, Nolidae) stand shoulder-to-shoulder at the MV (mercury vapour) night light.

Titulcia meterythra on the left and Titulcia confictella on the right.

If I had naming rights to this genus of moths, it would be Mirror Moths. The white scaled areas of the wings are highly reflective…..

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

Q: Where do all these moths come from and why the white background?

I use a 125W Mercury Vapour lamp for attracting night-flying insects. I used to set this up on my apartment rooftop or balcony with a white sheet and the surrounding tiled or painted walls as a base.
I found this fairly limiting due to often small numbers of attendees and usually the same species. So now I have invested in a gasoline generator and take my gear into the bush strapped to the back of my trusty electric bike.

The upside of this is an endless variety of species of all sizes, not only moths but from across the arthropod range; the downside is being totally overwhelmed by the sheer volume of insect life to the point where getting settled on the sheet is difficult due to a constant barrage of disturbances, disrupted fields of view for a clean photograph, and predation (an army of predatory wasps and mantids require employing your peripheral vision to be aware of your prize model potentially becoming dinner). Of course, other subjects might alight near the sheet on the ground or surrounding vegetation and they can be photographed there.

(NB. I use the light only for photographing night-flying insects. I do not trap or collect specimens.)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..