SINOBUG
Geometrid Moth (Ennominae, Geometridae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moth (Ennominae, Geometridae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Awl Caterpillar (Hasora sp., Coeliadinae, Hesperiidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Awl Caterpillar (Hasora sp., Coeliadinae, Hesperiidae)

Skipper Caterpillar (Hasora sp., Coeliadinae, Hesperiidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Robber Fly (Asilidae, Diptera)

This is another variety of insect absolutely reveling in the current climate. Any pathway with overhanging vegetation is lined with any number of species of robber fly perched on leaftips in the sun waiting for passing flying insect victims. The number of “hits” is amazing and it is hazardous for any winged arthropod to run the gauntlet of predators. Of course, human traffic only benefits the hunters because as we disturb hiding insects as we traverse the forest paths, we are sending them flying straight to their doom.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese flies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Robber Fly (Asilidae, Diptera)

This is another variety of insect absolutely reveling in the current climate. Any pathway with overhanging vegetation is lined with any number of species of robber fly perched on leaftips in the sun waiting for passing flying insect victims. The number of “hits” is amazing and it is hazardous for any winged arthropod to run the gauntlet of predators. Of course, human traffic only benefits the hunters because as we disturb hiding insects as we traverse the forest paths, we are sending them flying straight to their doom.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese flies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Zygaenid Day-flying Moth (Corma zelica, Chalcosiinae, Zygaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Zygaenid Day-flying Moth (Corma zelica, Chalcosiinae, Zygaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fulvous Forest Skimmer (Neurothemis fulvia)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fulvous Forest Skimmer (Neurothemis fulvia)

Fulvous Forest Skimmer (Neurothemis fulvia)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese dragonflies and damselflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Praying Mantis Nymph (Hierodula patellifera, Mantinae, Mantidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Beijing, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lantern Fly (Pyrops cf. lathburii, Fulgoridae, Hemiptera)

Pyrops is a genus of planthopper (the name lantern fly is deceptive) that occurs primarily in southeast Asia, containing about 60 species.They are fairly large insects, with much of the length due to an elongated, upcurving, snout-like projection of the head. The wings are generally brightly patterned in contrasting colours, and they are popular among collectors.
 
The head of some Fulgorid species is produced into a hollow process, resembling a snout, which is sometimes inflated and nearly as large as the body of the insect, sometimes elongated, narrow and apically upturned. It was believed, mainly on the authority of Maria Sibylla Merian, that this process, the so-called lantern, was luminous at night. Carl Linnaeus adopted the statement without question and coined a number of specific names, such as laternaria, phosphorea and candelaria which are still used today to illustrate the supposed fact, and thus aided in promoting a belief which centuries of observations have failed to confirm.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lantern Fly (Pyrops cf. lathburii, Fulgoridae, Hemiptera)

Pyrops is a genus of planthopper (the name lantern fly is deceptive) that occurs primarily in southeast Asia, containing about 60 species.They are fairly large insects, with much of the length due to an elongated, upcurving, snout-like projection of the head. The wings are generally brightly patterned in contrasting colours, and they are popular among collectors.

The head of some Fulgorid species is produced into a hollow process, resembling a snout, which is sometimes inflated and nearly as large as the body of the insect, sometimes elongated, narrow and apically upturned. It was believed, mainly on the authority of Maria Sibylla Merian, that this process, the so-called lantern, was luminous at night. Carl Linnaeus adopted the statement without question and coined a number of specific names, such as laternaria, phosphorea and candelaria which are still used today to illustrate the supposed fact, and thus aided in promoting a belief which centuries of observations have failed to confirm.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

THE VIEW FROM ABOVE" series on Flickr by itchydogimages/SINOBUG
- a collection of caterpillar images captured from the bird’s eye view
(Pu’er, Yunnan, China)

View all images in the THE VIEW FROM ABOVE series in my Flickr photostream HERE.



by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Male Common Gem (Poritia hewitsoni, Lycaenidae)

When I first photographed one of these little butterflies just over a year ago, it was the first record of the species (in fact the entire genus) occurring in China. They are official residents of neighboring Myanmar, Laos and nearby Thailand, so it is not surprising that they have bypassed visa protocols and crossed these borders.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Male Common Gem (Poritia hewitsoni, Lycaenidae)

When I first photographed one of these little butterflies just over a year ago, it was the first record of the species (in fact the entire genus) occurring in China. They are official residents of neighboring Myanmar, Laos and nearby Thailand, so it is not surprising that they have bypassed visa protocols and crossed these borders.

Male Common Gem (Poritia hewitsoni, Lycaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Arctiine Moth (Agylla remelana, Lithosiini, Arctiinae, Erebidae), male
male (left) and  female (right) 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Arctiine Moth (Agylla remelana, Lithosiini, Arctiinae, Erebidae), male

male (left) and female (right)
Arctiid Moth (Agylla remelana, Arctiinae), male Arctiid Moth (Agylla remelana, Arctiinae), female

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Epiplemiine Moth (Dysaethria sp., Epipleminae, Uraniidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Epiplemiine Moth (Dysaethria sp., Epipleminae, Uraniidae)

Epiplemiine Moth (Dysaethria sp., Epipleminae, Uraniidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Buff Tip Moth (Phalera angustipennis, Phalerinae, Notodontidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Buff Tip Moth (Phalera angustipennis, Phalerinae, Notodontidae)

Buff Tip (Phalera angustipennis, Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Chinese Bush Cricket (Gampsocleis gratiosa, Tettigoniidae)

A common Beijing practice, especially amongst the older set, is to keep crickets for their song. The Chinese Bush Cricket is a large vocal species which are kept in small cages and even carried around in pockets. I have kept a couple for several months during which time they provided superb picture opportunities. They do well on a diet of carrots and the occasional mealworm. Inevitably, it is easier to find these in a pet shop than in the wild.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Beijing, China

See more Chinese grasshoppers and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

Chinese Bush Cricket (Gampsocleis gratiosa, Tettigoniidae)

A common Beijing practice, especially amongst the older set, is to keep crickets for their song. The Chinese Bush Cricket is a large vocal species which are kept in small cages and even carried around in pockets. I have kept a couple for several months during which time they provided superb picture opportunities. They do well on a diet of carrots and the occasional mealworm. Inevitably, it is easier to find these in a pet shop than in the wild.

Chinese Bush Cricket (Gampsocleis gratiosa)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Beijing, China

See more Chinese grasshoppers and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Chrysocraspeda sp., Sterrhinae, Geometridae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Chrysocraspeda sp., Sterrhinae, Geometridae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomididae)

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae.
 
Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects.
 
Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards.


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomididae)

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae.

Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects.

Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards.

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomididae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..