SINOBUG
Mid-instar Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)
Late Instar Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia)(below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Mid-instar Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)

Late Instar Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillars (Cyclosia midamia, Zygaenidae)

Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia)(below)

Zygaenid Day-Flying Moth (Cyclosia midamia, Chalcosiinae, Zygaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies and moths, pupae and their larvae on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lady Beetle (Harmonia sp., Coccinellidae)

Although cannibalism of eggs by Coccinellid larva (in fact amongst and between all hungry Coccinellid life stages) is well-recognized and researched (this occurs typically when prey sources are limited in quality and quantity, or as an intentional means of boosting survival probability for first hatchings where egg clustering occurs), less is known about egg cannibalism and predation by adult Coccinellidae. What is apparent (maybe because they are an easier genus to study and very common), is that the Harmonia genus seems to be very adept at cannibalism at all stages of life both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Cannibalism of other Coccinellid species is significant where Harmonia occur as an invasive species (i.e. everywhere outside of Asia) and where they are overwhelming native species.

Certainly, nutritional stress and interspecies competition are logical reasons for egg cannibalism by adult beetles, but it is also proposed that females lay fertile and trophic (infertile) eggs. The purpose of the unviable trophic eggs is purely for the nutritional benefit of the female and not a failure of the reproductive process, and not a phenomenon restricted to lady beetles. So, in fact, the consumption of Coccinellid eggs by adult beetles is not an act of cannibalism in these circumstances, but an intentional  behavior aimed at supplementing nutrition.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Lady Beetle (Harmonia sp., Coccinellidae)

Although cannibalism of eggs by Coccinellid larva (in fact amongst and between all hungry Coccinellid life stages) is well-recognized and researched (this occurs typically when prey sources are limited in quality and quantity, or as an intentional means of boosting survival probability for first hatchings where egg clustering occurs), less is known about egg cannibalism and predation by adult Coccinellidae. What is apparent (maybe because they are an easier genus to study and very common), is that the Harmonia genus seems to be very adept at cannibalism at all stages of life both intra-specifically and inter-specifically. Cannibalism of other Coccinellid species is significant where Harmonia occur as an invasive species (i.e. everywhere outside of Asia) and where they are overwhelming native species.

Certainly, nutritional stress and interspecies competition are logical reasons for egg cannibalism by adult beetles, but it is also proposed that females lay fertile and trophic (infertile) eggs. The purpose of the unviable trophic eggs is purely for the nutritional benefit of the female and not a failure of the reproductive process, and not a phenomenon restricted to lady beetles. So, in fact, the consumption of Coccinellid eggs by adult beetles is not an act of cannibalism in these circumstances, but an intentional behavior aimed at supplementing nutrition.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

Longhorn Beetle (Monochamus guerryi, Lamiinae, Cerambycidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Grey Count (Tanaecia lepidea, Nymphalidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Grey Count (Tanaecia lepidea, Nymphalidae)

Grey Count (Tanaecia lepidea, Nymphalidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Monkey Moth (Eupterote sp., Eupterotidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Monkey Moth (Eupterote sp., Eupterotidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Assassin Bug (Endochus sp., Reduviidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Assassin Bug (Endochus sp., Reduviidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

Hello there! I was curious, what is the difference between a luna moth and a moon moth? Or are they just different names for the same moth? Thanks! :)
Anonymous

Common or generic insect names are useful for non-entomological people to describe insects but are generally very confusing, variable and differ from region to region both within countries and between countries and parts of the world.

Many North Americans are familiar with their Luna Moth (Actias luna, family Saturniidae). Described and named (as Phalena plumata caudata) by Petiver in 1700, the Luna Moth was the first North American Saturniid to be reported in the literature (Tuskes et al. 1996). The original Latin name of the Luna Moth (which referred to the long tails) was lost when Linnaeus converted the name to a binomial with the specific epithet luna in 1758.

The family name Saturniidae is based on the eyespots of some members of the family that contain concentric rings reminiscent of the planet Saturn (Powell 2003). Hence, Linnaeus gave the Luna Moth it’s species binomial of Actias luna based on its moon-like spots. (New Latin lūna, meaning moon. In current English, this would be lunar). So it is justified that Actias luna has the common name of Luna Moth.

However, North America does not have a monopoly on Saturniid moths (in fact far from it). Very similar Saturniid moths exist particularly in the tropics globally including many in the same genus of Actias. They are all Moon Moths by virtue of their classification, including Actias luna, the Luna Moth. But because of the luna in it’s scientific name, the title of Luna Moth probably (but not officially) belongs to the North American species.

So to answer your question, Luna and Moon Moths all belong to the same family of moths. The names are interchangeable depending on who or where you are. But it makes sense that Actias luna be called the Luna Moth. But it is just one of many Moon Moths.

Female Indian Moon Moth (Actias selene, Saturniidae)

On this night out in the Pu’er hills with the MV light, I was visited by not one, but two, female Moon Moths simultaneously. It was getting late and was starting to drizzle rain, so I had already packed up the camera and dismantled my sheet leaving the light on so I could see what I was doing.

Typical of the Saturniids, they are erratic flyers and crash and flap frantically where ever they land which is why it can be difficult to find a pristine specimen in the wild unless it has just emerged from pupation (or you raise them in captivity).

These moths are too big to photograph using my usual macro setup, so I had to unpack and disassemble my camera in the rain to get these shots.

Female Indian Moon Moth (Actias selene, Saturniidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)

Female Blue Imperial (Ticherra acte, Theclinae, Lycaenidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

Fishfly (Corydalidae, Megaloptera)

The family Corydalidae contains the megalopterous insects known as dobsonflies and fishflies.
 
Fishflies are sizeable Megalopterans, with a body usually larger than 25 mm. They often have long filamentous antennae, though in male fishflies they are characteristically feathered. The four large wings are translucent, smoky grey, or mixed, and the anterior pair is slightly longer than the posterior one.
 
The larvae are aquatic, active, armed with strong sharp mandibles, and breathe by means of abdominal branchial filaments. When full sized - which can take several years - they leave the water and spend a quiescent pupal stage on the land, in chambers dug under stones or logs, before metamorphosis into the sexually mature insect.
 
(attracted to MV lamp)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Fishfly (Corydalidae, Megaloptera)

The family Corydalidae contains the megalopterous insects known as dobsonflies and fishflies.

Fishflies are sizeable Megalopterans, with a body usually larger than 25 mm. They often have long filamentous antennae, though in male fishflies they are characteristically feathered. The four large wings are translucent, smoky grey, or mixed, and the anterior pair is slightly longer than the posterior one.

The larvae are aquatic, active, armed with strong sharp mandibles, and breathe by means of abdominal branchial filaments. When full sized - which can take several years - they leave the water and spend a quiescent pupal stage on the land, in chambers dug under stones or logs, before metamorphosis into the sexually mature insect.

(attracted to MV lamp)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

Pyralid Snout Moth (Orybina flaviplaga, Pyralidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Pyralid Snout Moth (Orybina flaviplaga, Pyralidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lymantriinae, Erebidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae, Geometridae)
(female top of image, male bottom of image and below)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Geometrid Moths (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae, Geometridae)
(female top of image, male bottom of image and below)

Geometrid Moth (Biston bengaliaria, Ennominae), male

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)

Tiger Beetle (Heptodonta ferrarii, Cicindelinae, Carabidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese beetles on my Flickr site HERE…..